Clean Air Act and Related Issues - 115th Congress (2017-2018)

Other Notable Bills

 

Relief from New Source Performance Standards Act (H.R. 453)

Background

On January 11, 2017, Reps. Collin Peterson (D-MN) and Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) introduced H.R. 453, the Relief from New Source Performance Standards Act of 2017, to delay by three years federal emission standards established in March 2015 for new residential wood heaters, pellet stoves, hydronic heaters and forced air furnaces.  In particular, the bill would postpone the compliance date of Step 2 of EPA’s New Source Performance Standards until May 15, 2023.    

Key Actions

January 11 2017 – H.R. 453, the Relief from New Source Performance Standards Act was introduced by Reps. Collin Peterson (D-MN) and Bob Goodlatte (R-VA).  The text of the bill, as introduced, is available here.

 

RPM Act (H.R. 350, S. 2013)

Background

On January 6, 2017, Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC) introduced H.R. 350, the Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports (RPM) Act to permanently prevent EPA from regulating modified motor vehicles used for racing.  On Janjuary 24, 2017, Senator Richard Burr (R-NC) introduced a companion - S. 203.

Key Actions

January 24, 2016 - S. 203, a Senate companion to H.R. 350, was introduced by Senator Richard Burr (R-NC).

January 6, 2017 – H.R. 350, the Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports (RPM) Act, was introduced by Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC).

 

Ozone Standards Implementation Act (S. 263, H.R. 806)

Background

Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) and Rep. Pete Olson (R-TX) introduced S. 263 and H.R. 806, the Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017 on February 1, 2017.  Under the companion bills, implementation of the 2008 and 2015 ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) would be phased in and final designations under the 2015 standard would be delayed until 2025.  In addition, the process by which NAAQS are established for any criteria pollutant would be amended to extend the timeframe for NAAQS reviews from every five years to every 10 years (although the EPA Administrator would have discretion to initiate an earlier review).  Also, when revising a NAAQS, the Administrator would be authorized to consider technological feasibility as a “secondary consideration” and required, prior to revising a NAAQS, to obtain advice from the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee regarding potential adverse effects related to implementation of a revised standard.  The bill would further require that until 2025 permits for new and modified industrial facilities be processed under the less-stringent 2008 ozone NAAQS.  Among other provisions of the bill are ones to ensure that for certain ozone and PM nonattainment areas states would not be required to include in their State Implementation Plans measures that are economically infeasible; amend the exclusions from the term “exceptional event” by changing “stagnation of air masses” to “ordinarily occurring stagnation of air masses” and eliminating “a meteorological event involving high temperatures or lack of precipitation”; eliminate the requirement for contingency measures in Extreme ozone nonattainment areas; and require EPA to submit to Congress, within two years, a report on the impact of foreign sources of pollution on compliance.    

Key Actions

February 1, 2017 – The Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017 – S. 263 and H.R. 806 – was introduced in the Senate and House by Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-SV) and Rep. Pete Olson (T-TX).